A fortunate sighting

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RedbackIInDidgeridooThere is a Redback living in the didgeridoo. Lucky I noticed it tonight, sitting in its web just outside the mouthpiece. It nimbly disappeared inside as soon as I took the photo. The didgeridoo rarely gets used, but occasionally someone wants to give it a try. Could have been nasty! I will try to catch it and put it outside.

Birding in Iron Bark country

Joining Murray Goulburn Birdlife has been a treat. Sharing birdwatching with friendly experts in the field guides you to locations of wonder and delights the senses in the process. Visiting the Rushworth / Whroo iron bark country on a perfect autumn day after the big dry might not have secured as many species sightings as some of the more experienced would have liked. However, I just love being out there, exploring a new landscape, appreciating its special features and every bird is a bonus.

A thought on photography

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My ageing 70D may not be in the professional class, but coupled with the Tamron 18-400mm super zoom it has the flexibility to engage with many subjects effectively. A day out with the camera is a day of  exploring and investigating. That is certainly enough to keep me happy – with every satisfying image a bonus!

The best things about using a camera are the ways in which it makes you observe more closely, see more clearly, examine subjects more intensely. That being said, the worst things about using a camera are the ways in which it can tempt you to be exclusive, focusing on the photo instead of being mindful of the present, capturing a photo moment instead of a set of contextual memories, creating an image for putting yourself in or at a scene, instead of understanding and appreciating your place in the scene.

Photographers should always be clear about their purpose, either recording an aspect of reality or creating a new one. Photography should not be deceitful.